Chapter 4 Section 0

Submitted by Tom Last on Sun, 06/10/2007 - 8:58pm.
The World As Percept

The Philosophy of Freedom Study Group
The World As Percept
Topics:
Percept-Concept
4.0 What a concept is cannot be expressed in words. Words can do no more than draw our attention to the fact that we have concepts.

Recording by Dale Brunsvold at Rudolf Steiner Audio.

4-0) MOOD OF EMPIRICISM (Sun)
[1] Through thinking, concepts and ideas arise. What a concept is cannot be expressed in words. Words can do no more than draw our attention to the fact that we have concepts. When someone sees a tree, his thinking reacts to his observation, an ideal element is added to the object, and he considers the object and the ideal complement as belonging together. When the object disappears from his field of observation, only the ideal counterpart of it remains. This latter is the concept of the object. The more our range of experience is widened, the greater becomes the sum of our concepts. But concepts certainly do not stand isolated from one another. They combine to form a systematically ordered whole. The concept "organism", for instance, links up with those of "orderly development" and "growth". Other concepts which are based on single objects merge together into a unity. All concepts I may form of lions merge into the collective concept "lion". In this way all the separate concepts combine to form a closed conceptual system in which each has its special place. Ideas do not differ qualitatively from concepts. They are but fuller, more saturated, more comprehensive concepts. I must attach special importance to the necessity of bearing in mind, here, that I make thinking my starting point, and not concepts and ideas which are first gained by means of thinking. For these latter already presuppose thinking. My remarks regarding the self-supporting and self-determined nature of thinking cannot, therefore, be simply transferred to concepts. (I make special mention of this, because it is here that I differ from Hegel, who regards the concept as something primary and original.)

[2] Concepts cannot be gained through observation. This follows from the simple fact that the growing human being only slowly and gradually forms the concepts corresponding to the objects which surround him. Concepts are added to observation.

Topic: Percept - concept
  • What a concept is cannot be said in words.
  • When someone sees a tree, his thinking reacts to his observation, an ideal element is added to the object, and he considers the object and the ideal counterpart as belonging together.
  • When the object disappears from his field of observation, only the ideal counterpart of it remains. This latter is the concept of the object.
  • All the separate concepts combine to form a closed conceptual system in which each has its special place.
  • Concepts cannot be gained through observation. Concepts are added to observation.
Match-up Quiz

Practical Training In Thought
Thinking Exercise #4
Improving Memory

 

AttachmentSize
4-0.mp3992.02 KB
What a Concept Is by Tim Bourke
Concepts by Lori Perry
Observing Thinking by Tim Bourke
Great! by Lori Perry
Grouping Concepts by Lori Perry
The Sun Chapter by Lori Perry
Time-Limited Thinking? by Lori Perry
concept as time by patri (not verified)