John Ralph's journal

Cnapter 00 The Aims of All Knowledge Second Draft

Submitted by John Ralph on Sun, 03/06/2011 - 12:57pm.

21st Century Enlightenment

Submitted by John Ralph on Tue, 02/22/2011 - 11:05am.

I recommend this animated video of a talk by Matthew Taylor at the RSA.

 

'Haltung'? Ethical Individuality?

Submitted by John Ralph on Wed, 02/16/2011 - 4:01am.

John's Second Draft of Chapter 3 [4]

Submitted by John Ralph on Fri, 01/07/2011 - 6:29pm.

A Thought for a New Year

Submitted by John Ralph on Wed, 01/05/2011 - 9:41am.

This was sent to me as a New Year's gift.  "A seed is a very small thing." I have no idea who wrote it but it rings true.

---

A seed is a very small thing.

You plant it, and in that secret place under the earth, if feeds from the soil, it breaks, and then a shoot comes up from the ground.

This small shoot seeks the light as it grows, and in time, it turns into a large tree. If you had not been told, you would not believe this tree came from such a small thing that once was hidden in the depths.

We cannot see what happens under the soil, because it is hidden from our eyes. Only the seed is present when the change happens. But eventually we see a tree, which cannot be ignored.

We do not consider the strength that resides within the seed because it is such a small thing. But we cannot ignore the tree.

This is an illustration of a certain belief that we fall into very easily, because it makes sense when we first think about it. It is the idea that our private lives should not matter to anyone but ourselves.

We look at our private lives as hidden from view, and we think they add no meaning whatsoever to the lives we live in public.

We say things like "whatever a man does in his private life is nobody's business."

Even more so, whatever a man thinks in his own head, in the deepest recesses of his mind, has little or no influence on the way that he behaves in public.

The truth is that those things which we do in private, even our thought life, matter more than anything else we do in life.

Because our private thoughts are like seeds.

They are planted in our heads. During that time, no one but we are able to

John's Third Draft of Chapter 2 [3]

Submitted by John Ralph on Thu, 10/28/2010 - 4:41pm.

John's Third Draft of Chapter 1 [2]

Submitted by John Ralph on Thu, 10/28/2010 - 4:35pm.

John Dewey and Rudolf Steiner on Education

Submitted by John Ralph on Wed, 07/07/2010 - 5:44am.
What would John Dewey and Rudolf Steiner have said to one another about education? 
 
Although they were contemporaries, they never met. Jacque Ensign (Department of Education Studies, University of Virginia) has concocted a lively fictional conversation about education between John Dewey and Rudolf Steiner here, courtesy of the ever-surprising online anthroposophical journal from Argentina, The Southern Review.  
 
Jacque Ensign writes:
 
John Dewey and Rudolf Steiner were contemporaries who each launched radical worldwide educational approaches: Progressivism and Waldorf schools. Each wrote and spoke about his philosophy and formulated concrete ways to put it into practice in schools. Steiner wrote over sixty books and 6,000 essays, lectures, and articles. Dewey was such a prolific writer that whole books have been published as Dewey bibliographies. In many respects, Dewey and Steiner differed greatly in their philosophies and methods, but they also shared some common premises about education. With many professional parents sending their children to Waldorf schools, it is time to look at Waldorf education from a Deweyan perspective. Read on…

Handbook of all Rudolf Steiner’s lectures and books in German

Submitted by John Ralph on Sun, 07/04/2010 - 5:49am.

German readers may not realize that there is an indexed handbook by Christian Karl in PDF format (65MB) covering all Rudolf Steiner’s lectures and books.